Archive for year 2010


When it comes to social media, there’s no place like home

Arminda Lindsay has become one of the most steadfast {grow} community members in 2010.  Here’s Arminda’s story about finding her new career in social media marketing in a very familiar place. It is a fitting way to end “Community Week!”  Bring it home, Arminda …

Every year The Wizard of Oz played on network television during the fall lineup. And every year we begged, pleaded, and negotiated reasonable terms with our parents for the opportunity to stay up past our bedtime to watch. And yes, every year Dorothy found the Yellow Brick Road, formed lasting friendships, defeated the Wicked Witch, and discovered home is where she belonged, and she already possessed inside her the “magic” she was looking for to take her there.

Metaphorically speaking, at the beginning of 2010, I felt my career was a tornado that landed smack in the middle in Oz. I wasn’t unhappy with my clients, nor was I being shown the door. In fact, I am business partners with my brother, and have never been happier than in this vocation. I just felt like a change was on the horizon, and decided to pursue the inclination. When I emerged from my technicolor doorway, I started looking for my own Yellow Brick Road to follow — certain that my journey would lead me to “the next big thing,” and I would, invariably, change the world.

Here’s what I discovered:

Social Media was something I’d used sporadically, at best, and only for personal reasons. I had a profile on Facebook and was actively gathering friends I couldn’t even remember — from places I am still trying to forget! But social media for professional purposes? Okay – I had a profile on LinkedIn, but who actually uses that? And some time last year I created something on Twitter, but that seemed like a waste of time so I was in social media “Kansas.”

The on-ramp to my personal Yellow Brick Road was a conscious decision to try social media for business purposes. What’s the worst thing that could happen? I could follow the road for a while — really giving it a fair shake — and if I still felt like it wasn’t worth my time, I had an exit strategy in place.

I put on my red shoes and started following the social media path, which led me to tweeting. Not sure how or where to jump into the whole Twittersphere, I kept late hours for many nights, searching for my own Scarecrow and Tinman, hoping these new followers would join me in an adventure.

My early tweets were nothing to write home about; they were basically regurgitations of what others had said or links to articles of interest – mostly about social media. Then something interesting happened: late one night @markwschaefer tweeted that he’d just re-watched The Princess Bride. Unable to resist, I tweeted a quote back to Mark from the same movie, and our friendship was born. And that’s when it occurred to me there are REAL people on Twitter, and they actually care about what’s being said and who’s saying it.

I started attending local tweet-ups, luncheons and get-togethers because the people behind the tweets (unlike the man behind curtain) need to be noticed. Subsequently, the real people I have met, and continue to meet, through Twitter and LinkedIn are my friends. And these very real people are sharing their knowledge, their professional connections, more business, yes, and equally important — lasting Friendships.

I did have a Wicked Witch of my own making. I kept thinking I needed to search elsewhere for my professional happiness. With the support of my friends, I looked at where I was happiest, what I was most passionate about. That would lead me Home.

After wandering through Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and my own blog for the past seven months, I finally clicked my heels together and realized all I need to do is apply this new-found passion for social media to my existing happy business, and I’m exactly where I belong: Home! In business with my brother — but with the added benefit of social media working its magic on everything I touch!

Arminda is Vice President of Whetstone Leadership, which provides management and leadership training to executives.  You can find her regularly chiming in on Twitter at @allarminda or read her random blog at www.allarminda.com.

Is your company creating a social media ghost town?

This week we continue to put {grow} in the hands of the community by featuring Nashville marketer Laura Click and her ideas about why companies abandon their social efforts:

A few months ago, I had the pleasure of meeting Mark for lunch at popular Nashville spot called Urban Flats.  At the end of our meal, we were impressed to receive a card promoting the restaurant’s Twitter and Facebook profiles with our checks. Certainly, this was a great way to invite customers to connect with the restaurant online.

Recently, I visited Urban Flats again and received the same social media promo card. I decided to tweet about the great meal I had there with a friend. As a social media enthusiast, I was hoping to hear back from the restaurant. But, instead of a tweet, I heard crickets chirping.

A couple of days later, I checked out the restaurant’s twitter page and found they hadn’t updated it in months. What a shame. It’s like sending out invitations to a party at your house, but you’re not home when people show up.

The Urban Flats Twitter page is a prime example of a social media ghost town, and I’m quite confident this isn’t the only of its kind on the web. In fact, I think this is scenario is becoming more common as statistics show that only 21 percent of Twitter users are active on the site.

So, why do people let their Twitter profile, blog or Facebook page become a social media ghost town? Here some common reasons:

  • Lack of time. While social media may indeed be “free”, people rarely take into account the investment of time needed to tend to it. Although you don’t need to spend hours a day on social media sites, it’s important to carve out some time to get anything out of it. When people don’t take the time, the site falters.

 

  • Lack of content ideas. On many ghost town sites, you can practically smell the desperation as the posts begin to dwindle. “We have a patio!” or “We have great food!” It’s clear that many people just don’t know what to say, so they quit trying. Let’s use Urban Flats as an example – what could they share with their customers? Here are some ideas:
  1. Ask customers about their favorite flatbread or wine.
  2. Thank customers who tweet about the restaurant or check in via Foursquare or Gowalla.
  3. Create a recipe contest – the winner gets to name the flat bread and gets a free meal to go with it.
  4. Retweet posts from the shops nearby.
  5. Share articles about healthy eating, events in Nashville or urban renewal (something Urban Flats promotes).
  6. Search for people looking for restaurant suggestions in Nashville and suggest Urban Flats.
  7. Send menu updates, offer specials and promote events.
  8. Post photos of your staff members or share behind the scenes look at making the flatbreads.

 

  • Lack of success. Some people believe that merely having a social media presence will cause piles of money to show up on your doorstep. Clearly, this is not the case. While there may be a number of factors that contribute to an unsuccessful social media effort, businesses that don’t see immediate results tend to give up.
  • Lack of comfort. Believe it or not, social media doesn’t come naturally to everyone. If someone isn’t comfortable using social media or if it doesn’t match their personality, it shows. And, they often quit as a result.

A ghost town is a depressing place full of abandoned buildings, broken glass and tumbleweed. Don’t let your blog or profile become one. If you do, perhaps it’s time to consider if no social media presence is better than a ghost town.

Why do you think people abandon their social media efforts? Should they close down their blog or profiles if they quit updating it?

Laura Click is founder and chief innovator at Blue Kite Marketing, a consulting group dedicated to helping small businesses grow. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog at www.lauraclick.com.

My American Dream: Growing a Business

I was up for PR blog of the year and came in second to Gini Dietrich. Best thing that ever happened to me. It introduced me to this inspirational business dynamo who has become a great friend. You’re going to enjoy this gutsy Community Week guest  post as Gini explores the strain of moving from entrepreneur to business leader.

Ah…the American dream. We all want to work for ourselves, in some fashion. If we work for The Man, it’s to have autonomy to do what we think best for the company. If we work for ourselves, it’s to have work/life balance and the flexibility to come and go as we please. But the ultimate American dream is to grow a business so we can make a gazillion dollars and have all of the joys of balance, doing what we think is best, and flexibility. Right? Wrong.

Growing a business is hard work. It’s the hardest work you’ll ever do. A lot of us start businesses because we’re really good at our trade and because we see value in doing things differently, but can’t affect change working for The Man. What we don’t realize is that, once you decide to grow a business, you no longer are good at your trade – you must become good at being a company grower. You don’t realize that you now work for many people – employees, clients, partners, and vendors. You don’t work for yourself. And figuring out how to grow a business is not an easy thing, unless you have some crack idea (Facebook) that catches on despite your lack of business acumen.

For the rest of us, however, designing business growth is just that – a carefully calculated plan. And, if you’re a typical entrepreneur, calculation, attention to detail, and planning are not in your vocabulary. You’re great at the big picture, innovative ideas, and leading people toward the vision, but you’re terrible at process, procedures, managing, and standards.

Which brings me to a growing pain I am experiencing right now at Arment Dietrich: Creating process and holding people accountable to the bigger picture. It’s very uncomfortable and completely out of my capability…which means it’s hard work. Really hard work.

Deep down I know that I’ve gotten the business to the size I can get it alone. I also know that to create sustainable growth that isn’t totally reliant on me, there have to be some standards of work that create consistency. And I know people just need to know what the expectations are so they can reach (or, ideally, exceed) them.

So why is this so darn hard?

Sure, it’s easier for me to fix a situation when a client is upset. Sure, it’s easier for me to write a strategy brief than to spend time coaching my team. Sure, it’s easier for me to find a new client to make up for the gap in our budget forecast. So, then, why do we have staff? Why am I growing a business that is sustainable and not reliant on me? Oh yeah…because easier doesn’t mean better.

So here I go. I’m holding people accountable. I’m following a carefully designed process for our staff meetings, for individual meetings, and for client meetings. I’m communicating over and over and over and over and over again our vision. I’m realizing this isn’t about Gini Dietrich, but is about the business. I’m empowering people to follow their ideas through to the end. I’m being totally transparent about our financials so everyone has a stake in the game. And, together, we’re going to grow this thing into a force to be reckoned with…no matter how hard or uncomfortable it makes me. The comfort will come as I continue on my journey of turning from a great communicator to a better company grower.

Gini Dietrich is the founder and chief executive officer of Arment Dietrich, Inc., a firm that uses non-traditional marketing in a digital world.  The author of the award-winning Spin Sucks (@SpinSucks), Gini has delivered numerous keynotes, panel discussions, coaching sessions, and workshops across North America on the subject of using online technology in communication and marketing.

Social media — now for engineers too!

This week I’m turning {grow} over to the community this week and today offer a social media tale from an unlikely participant, my friend George Cooper. George is the engineer’s engineer and approached the social web with healthy skepticism. But as he explains here, there seems to be a place for social media even in the industrial world …

Social media is about connections.  No connections, no communication, and ultimately … no business benefits.  All of us start out with someone being the first connection, then a few at a time connect with us, then gradually we build a larger population… but why?

If connections are the “how” we are present in social media, our stories are the “why” our connections listen to us. Making connections and telling stories is something I can relate to.

Most of my work is with highly-technical industrial clients of one sort or another.  When I arrive at a facility, I know I’ll be talking with the client’s subject matter experts as well as incumbents in the job we’re there to work with.  I’ll need to establish my technical credibility with these folks, the quicker the better (the longer you drag it out, the less chance of success).  I always start out with who I am and why I’m there.  Sometimes, that’s met with the stony-eyed stare, the one that says, “You’re walking in the door to be an expert on our jobs?  Uh-huh.  Prove it.”

So, I begin to tell a few stories about places I’ve been and things I’ve done, usually from the perspective of when I had an opportunity to learn from others.  If I’m doing it properly, my audience’s concentration shifts from me to my stories, and they begin to connect to me through my stories

Then I get them to tell stories — THEIR stories!

Everyone wants to tell stories about what they do.  Some are better at it than others, some speak more freely than others, but pretty much everyone wants to make a connection and tell stories about themselves and what they do.  It’s the nature of humans as social creatures and the fundamental basis for establishing a relationship, work and non-work-related.

Which brings me back to social media, from an industrial perspective.

Those of us engaged in the industrial world have stories to tell, too.  I do.  I’ll shamelessly plug that I’m working to bring about an industrial renaissance in America, and see that telling those stories through the social web might be just the way to get things started.   I’m an engineer, here in the social media world, learning to make connections, tell my stories, and make things happen.  Hopefully, there will be people (maybe even you?) who will gradually hear about my ideas, become interested, connect with me and start a journey together.

I’d offer that social media – connections and stories – is about all of us, from marketing gurus like Mark to industrial folks like me, and everyone in between, who have a story to tell and a connection to make. It’s the next logical step, it’s the evolution of how we communicate and connect, isn’t it?

So if you’re struggling with colleagues and customers who don’t see a place for social media in their business, tell them to look me up. If I can work with it in my industrial and technical environment, they can do it too!

George Cooper of Development Concepts posts about an industrial renaissance in the U.S., workforce development, and things that matter.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...