Study shows Twitter users are powerful consumers

A new study finds consumers active on Twitter are three times more likely to impact a brand’s online reputation through syndicated Tweets, blog posts, articles and product reviews than the average consumer.

The ExactTarget survey of more than 1,500 consumers concludes that Twitter has become the gathering place for content creators whose influence spills over into every other corner of the internet.

Key findings of the research include:

– Twitter users are the most influential online consumers — 72 percent publish blog posts at least monthly, 70 percent comment on blogs, 61 percent write at least one product review monthly and 61 percent comment on news sites.

– Daily Twitter users are 6 times more likely to publish articles, five times more likely to post blogs, seven times more likely to post to Wikis and three times more likely to post product reviews at least monthly compared to non-Twitter users.

– 23 percent of online consumers read Twitter updates at least monthly.

– 11 percent of online consumers read Twitter updates, but do not have a Twitter account themselves.

– 20 percent of consumers indicate they have followed a brand in order to interact with the company — more than become email subscribers or Facebook fans for the sake of interaction.

– Men are more than twice as likely as women to follow brands on Twitter to interact with the company (29 percent compared to 13 percent).

– Nine out of the 10 most common motivations for consumers to follow a brand on Twitter involve consumers seeking information from a company.

Intuitively, these finding make sense to me.  But here is an even more interesting fact to consider. I intentionally surround myself with an audience of professional marketing professionals, educators, writers and business executives. I don’t have too many from the Justin Bieber crowd in my Twitter stream. While these statistics are powerful, they may be even more powerful if the sample was taken from MY tribe … or yours.  Certainly something to think about isn’t it?

Five steps to prepare you for the social media marathon


The world of work is different today.  It’s not a 9-5 daily sprint, it’s an always-on, always connected, all-out communication MARATHON.  And like any athlete preparing for an intense and extended effort, it takes preparation — some mental, some physical, and some conditioning that only gets easier through discipline and practice.

I carry a heavy workload.  Throw my commitment to the social web on top of it and I’ve had to make adjustments to the way I mentally, and even physically, approach work every day. Here are a few tricks for handling this new world of work.

1) Schedule every important task. One problem I had was having only a vague idea that I had to work on certain important projects — You know, “get it done by the end of the week,” for example.  But then some distracting snowball would start, it would roll down hill, gathering all my client time with it.  So now I schedule almost everything I do.  I set aside time for blogging, planning, administration, and projects, and then I schedule less important phone calls and meetings around those blocks of time.

2) Don’t apologize for being “on.” I grew up in a world where dad worked 8-5, five days a week and mom was a homemaker.  There was a time for work and a time for family and it was highly compartmentalized and predictable.  That type of schedule is impossible as an employee within a global, digital 24×7 world.  I still strike a balance between work and play, family and customers, but it’s not my father’s Oldsmobile.  I rarely have a day when I don’t work to some extent. I still have a twinge of guilt when I squeeze in a little work on a Saturday but then I realize how lucky I am to be flexible to take time off in the middle of the week because the digital world doesn’t care when I work. As long as it all balances out in the end, forgive yourself for not being your dad (or mom). It’s just the way it is. P.S. My kids are grown. That helps with the flexible work schedule!

3) Get a virtual assistant. Yes, there is a way to get more than 24 hours in a day.  Instead of getting mired in routine administration I can push some work to my friend, a talented stay-at-home mom who is appreciative of a little extra income.  This keeps me focused on strategic work and also affords me the luxury of “dead-ends.” What I mean by that is when I have a wild idea for something, I can have my VA do some research on it before I waste too much time on a concept that ends up going no where. My challenge is to be disciplined to delegate and buy myself more time!

4) Shift perspective. It is not unusual for me to spend 12 hours or more each day in front of a computer. This is not healthy in any way. So I take frequent breaks, I shift positions, I may work standing up or in different locations to provide some ease to the body and energy to the mind.

5) Write ahead. Over the past two weeks I have been absolutely slammed with extremely important, intense client work.  But I was still able to keep up a a high-quality blog with consistent posts because I write ahead.  I am constantly writing posts or parts of posts as the ideas come to me so when that slam time comes I can draw from the pool. I currently have 45 posts in the “draft” pile. Some of them will never see the light of day but I am constantly adding to the inventory of ideas, even if it is just a sentence or an inspiring quote. This is an essential survival skill for anybody who hopes to keep up a blog if it’s not your job.

I don’t have time management down perfectly and never will.   Here’s where I still struggle:

  • I tend to schedule myself with too little rooom for error. When a computer failure hits it can really throw me for a loop.  As a solo entrepreneur, I sure miss the IT department.
  • While the flexibility of my schedule is great, I have a hard time shutting my mind completely down.  I am always twitching with ideas. It takes me at least two days of digital de-tox to begin to relax.
  • I need to jog more than I blog.

As I re-read this post I realized like it might seem that I work all the time. I don’t.  I have lots of outside interests and activities. And my life is a ball.  I do work a lot but it is more like fun than work … most of the time!

How are you running your marathon?   Where are you still struggling?

Social media and the Rutgers suicide

I’m sure you were disturbed, as I was, by the story of a young man who committed suicide when his sexual encounter was secretly captured on a video and posted on the Internet.  The tragedy is doubly sobering for me because it occurred at Rutgers University where I begin a social media teaching assignment in a few weeks.

I have read no fewer than three blog posts blaming the social web for this incident and after three it was time for me to stop reading.

Humans have an incredible capacity for evil. We like to think of ourselves as civilized but we are not. We are simply contained.

The social web shines a bright light on whatever humans are already doing, both good and bad.  Blaming the social web for human evil is like blaming a gun for a war.

Awhile ago I wrote a post predicting that by the end of 2011 there would be a social media crime or crisis that would force the channel to be legislated to some degree, probably around privacy.  I doubt this suicide was the case that will do it, but it is inevitable I’m afraid, not because of the inherent problem with the social web, but because of the inherent problems with people.

The Associated Press found at least 12 cases in the U.S. since 2003 in which children and young adults between 11 and 18 killed themselves after falling victim to some form of “cyberbullying” — teasing, harassing or intimidating with pictures or words distributed online or via text message.

In probably the best-known case, a 13-year-old girl hanged herself in 2006 after she received messages on MySpace — supposedly from a teenage boy — cruelly dumping her. An adult neighbor was later found guilty of taking part in the hoax, but the conviction was overturned.

The social web has the ability to heal, connect and create but unfortunately, like its human creators, it will always have the ability to destroy.

Illustration: Original news feed for this article can be found here.

Social Media and the Start-Up (video)

What would you think about starting a high-end coffee business — in a location that had already housed a failed high-end coffee business — in the teeth of a recession?  Oh yeah … there’s a Starbucks down the street.

Sound like a recipe for disaster?  Well, it can be a sweet success if you have the marketing moxie of Brian Myers of Javerde Coffee, the subject of this video interview.

Brian talks about creating an “organic” relationship with customers, bootstrapping with social media, and eventual world domination.

If you’re eager to learn more about entrepreneurship, guerrilla marketing and creative business uses of social media for a start-up, you’ll love this short video clip!

P.S. Sure, they roast their own beans but I was there because they use ice cream to sweeten their coffee drinks.

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